LAST NIGHT: DISCUSSION ON WISDOM

Last night, Antonio Myers, Nate Judge, Jennie Friedman, Heather Reed, and Robbie Barnett gathered in the Writing Center for the 2012-2013 kick-off meeting of Free Thinkers Society, a discussion on our theme of Wisdom. Each member shared and discussed slices of wisdom from poets, political leaders, athletes, philosophers, and personal experiences. It was a wondering first meeting in our new Writing Center. Free Thinkers Society is open to anyone interested; be sure to join us next Tuesday night at 5:30 for our next meeting!

Here is some of what was shared:

Antonio Myers:

“Experience is not what happens to you; it’s what you do with what happens to you.” – Aldous Huxley

“A fool flatters himself, a wise man flatters the fool.” – Edward G. Bulwer-Lytton

“Honesty is the first chapter in the book of wisdom” – Thomas Jefferson

Robbie Barnett:

“If you’re trying to achieve, there will be roadblocks. I’ve had them; everybody has had them. But obstacles don’t have to stop you. If you run into a wall, don’t turn around and give up. Figure out how to climb it, go through it, or work around it.” – Michael Jordan

Heather Reed:

“In dreams and in love there are no impossibilities.” – Janos Arnay

“Be not afraid of life. Believe that life is worth living, and your belief will help create the fact.” – Henry James

” Every morning, I get up and look through the ‘Forbes’ list of the richest people in America. If I’m not there, I go to work.” – Robert Orben

Jennie Friedman:

“You must know your role in someone’s life. Not just for you to put yourself in the right place, but for you to lessen your expectations.” – Anon

Nate Judge:

“A good head and a good heart are always a formidable combination.” – Nelson Mandela

“If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart.” – Nelson Mandela

“Discipline is the bridge between goals and accomplishment.” – Jim Rohn


Finally, we watched and discussed a TED talk by Barry Schwartz entitled, “The real crisis? We stopped being wise.”